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Chinese Drywall Causes Concern

While water and wind damage from hurricanes Ivan and Katrina have been repaired years ago, many homeowners in the Gulf Coast region are still unable to live in their homes. During the construction frenzy following these two storms from 2004 to 2008, drywall was imported from China to meet the demand. However, some people are now saying that the Chinese drywall used to repair homes in Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and Virginia is defective and is making homeowners ill.

After complaints of health problems such as irritated skin and eyes, difficulty breathing, coughing, headaches, bloody noses, sinus infections and asthma attacks began to roll in, an investigation revealed that the Chinese drywall used in these particular homes emits sulfur gasses.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said the drywall is toxic and could lead to a number of health concerns, as well as corrode metals within a house. However, it has not yet recalled the defective product. It said it needs to continue its investigation and gather sufficient scientific proof before doing so.

At this time, it is believed the only way to get rid of the drywall’s negative effects is to remove the product completely and properly clean a structure’s studs. In some cases, furniture and other personal property may need to be replaced due to contamination. The cost of repair, as you can imagine, is high.

Due to the extensive and expensive remodeling process required, many homeowners are finding themselves making mortgage payments on uninhabitable homes, as well as paying rent where they are actually living. They are needlessly suffering both financially and physically. We will likely hear more about this issue of toxic Chinese drywall in the weeks and months to come. Contact Saginaw, MI accident attorneys to get a free consultation today.

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Changing to Key Resource

The global healthcare industry is facing an era of unprecedented change with new demands from customers and regulators, rapid technological innovation, industry consolidation and increasing cost pressures.

In this changing industry, human and intellectual capital are increasingly becoming the key scarce resource. The ability to attract and recruit the right people with the right knowledge and skills is a key source of competitive advantage, especially if you know the right portsmouth va employment lawyers.

Our healthcare practice is a recognised leader and pace-setter, working in partnership with our clients to help them to gain competitive advantage by recruiting the very best people. We work with major multinational companies, high growth emerging companies and specialist businesses in pharmaceuticals (ethical and OTC), biotech, devices, diagnostics and healthcare services and solutions.

Our consultants are experienced in managing local and international assignments across a wide range of functional areas including General Management, Commercial, Medical, Scientific, Operations, Finance, IS and HR functions. This includes roles at board level and for senior and middle management plus specialist appointments, typically at salaries ranging from Ł45,000 to Ł200,000 per annum.

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Can sleep apnea testing stop Wisconsin truck accidents?

Truck accidents are horrifying experiences even for the best Michigan personal injury law firms, but unfortunately common events throughout Wisconsin. Although there are many things that can cause a truck accident, driver fatigue is a common contributing factor. Truckers work long hours and sometimes forge timesheets in order to move their cargo further without having to take the legally required rest breaks.

There are also truckers who are unable to get restful sleep because of a condition called sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is more common in obese individuals and consists of shallow breaths or breathing stoppages which disrupt the normal sleep cycle. Individuals with sleep apnea are unable to obtain the deep restorative sleep needed to properly control a vehicle and are more likely to be involved in a car accident.

One woman who lost her husband in a truck accident says that sleep apnea testing should be required for truck drivers so that other people do not have to go through the pain and loss that she suffered.

“If you could have seen the scene that killed my husband or any of the other scenes that have been tied to sleep apnea and truck wrecks, it does look like a war zone,” the widow said at a public meeting of the Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee and the Medical Review Board.

“How many more families have to be torn apart before we do something?” she asked.

The boards recently recommended mandatory sleep apnea testing for obese truckers and mandatory testing for truckers involved in fatigued driving crashes. Some trucking industry insiders are fighting the recommendations and it is unclear whether they will be adopted.

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Man claims sporting goods company’s negligence caused accident

When people go to a store, they expect that they will not be exposed to dangerous tripping hazards. If these hazards are present, they can lead to harmful accidents. Recently, in Texas, a man has claimed that he suffered a trip and fall accident due to a store owner’s negligence.

The accident allegedly occurred at a sporting goods store in Pasadena, Texas in March of 2009. The accident reportedly occurred while a man was walking through one of the aisles of the store. The man alleges that this aisle was cluttered with display tables. The man claims that he tripped on a box that was on the floor of the aisle. The man alleges that this caused him to fall into a metal display rack.

The man claims that he suffered injuries to his ear, nose, eye socket, scalp and shoulder as a result of falling into the metal rack.

The man has now brought a lawsuit against the sporting goods company which owns the store. The man claims that the company was negligent in allowing display tables to be in the aisles and products to be on the floor. The man claims that this negligence created a hazard which caused his injuries. It will be interesting to see how this case progresses.

The allegations from the portland or personal injury attorneys in this case demonstrate how important it is for stores to be free of tripping hazards. Customers are much safer when this is the case. Thus, one hopes that all business owners avoid negligent conduct which would give rise to tripping hazards.

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Child Died of Condition Doctors did not Disclose, Parents Allege

The parents of a child who died in 2009 will sue the child’s surgeon and a Michigan hospital for medical malpractice in Michigan. They allege that the surgeon and hospital failed to alert the parents about the heart condition that caused the child’s death. The child, a ten-year-old boy, was born with Long QT Syndrome, a treatable but fatal heart defect.
According to a recent article in the Detroit News, the ten-year-old was found dead in his bed the morning of April 17, 2009. Three years earlier, the boy underwent surgery to have his tonsils and adenoids taken out. To prepare for the operation, the surgeon had an electrocardiogram (EKG) performed on the boy to examine his heart. The EKG revealed the long QT problem, but neither the doctor nor the hospital, which was then known as Marlette Community Hospital, ever told the parents or the child’s regular doctor.
The family’s lawyer said that the surgeon and Marlette Community, now known as Marlette Community, committed malpractice when they did not communicate the results of the EKG. He said the parents will sue the surgeon and the hospital in Sanilac Circuit Court for unspecified damages.
Long QT Syndrome is caused by a genetic mutation in the heart. It causes rapid, arrhythmic heartbeats that can lead to seizures or sudden death. The syndrome is treatable through medication, surgery or through implanting a defibrillator.
The accused surgeon declined to comment for the Detroit News story. A spokeswoman for Marlette Regional also declined comment besides to extend the hospitals thoughts and prayers to the 10-year-old’s family.

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JURY RULES THAT PFIZER’S MENOPAUSE DRUGS CAUSED WOMEN’S CANCER

Many women in New Jersey and elsewhere take prescription drugs to help them weather the difficult symptoms of menopause. Hormone-replacement drugs can be helpful in easing hot flashes, mood swings and other uncomfortable ailments.

However, for menopausal women who unknowingly take defective drugs, the cure may be worse than the condition. Sadly, millions of American women have taken hormone-replacement drugs that have been shown to cause cancer.

Three drugs in particular have been the subject of numerous lawsuits. They are Premarin, Provera and Prempro, all manufactured by units of Pfizer.

Prior to 1995, menopausal women were commonly prescribed both Premarin and Provera to be taken together in order to treat symptoms. Prempro, which came out in 1995, is a combination of the two.

In 2002, an important study was released that linked these drugs to cancer. More than six million women were taking either Prempro or the related combination of drugs at the time.

Since then, Pfizer has faced a significant number of bellingham wa lawsuits related to its dangerous hormone-replacement drugs. Recently, a Philadelphia jury awarded three women a combined total of $72.6 million in damages after the plaintiffs successfully argued that Pfizer’s drugs caused or contributed to the development of their breast cancer.

One of the plaintiffs took Prempro while the other two women took the combination of Premarin and Provera. All had taken the drugs for more than two years. None of the women had history of breast cancer in their families.

The outcome of this lawsuit represents both a financial and moral victory for the plaintiffs. Sadly, despite the dangers of these drugs, they are still on the market. Millions of women may have already been injured and millions more may still be at risk.

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NEW JERSEY TURNPIKE ACCIDENT VICTIM NARROWLY ESCAPES DEATH

We have previously written that the New Jersey Turnpike is hot spot for serious crashes, including car and truck accidents. Factors like road construction only exacerbate the dangers already present from a high volume of traffic and dangerous drivers.

Yesterday, a commercial driver for a New Jersey company had his van destroyed on the Turnpike in an incident that was apparently caused by a nearby construction crew. Miraculously, he escaped relatively unscathed from a bizarre accident that easily could have been fatal.

The 63-year-old man was driving along the Turnpike in Mercer County at approximately 8 a.m. yesterday morning while a construction crane just off the highway was in the process of lifting a large piece of metal.

Suddenly, the metal beam swung into the line of traffic and smashed into the man’s Econoline van, completely taking off the vehicle’s roof, according to New Jersey State Police.

Amazingly, the man survived the accident. He did suffer injuries, including a broken thumb, cuts on his head that required stitches and cuts on his hand. His vehicle, however, was in much worse shape.

A tow-truck operator who responded to the accident said: “I can’t believe he walked away. I mean the entire passenger side and the roof were peeled off the van completely. It looks like a convertible.”

For now, the man and his family are simply celebrating the fact that he survived. However, attitudes may change as the incident is investigated. If the accident was caused by negligence on the part of the construction company or anyone else, the driver may be able to seek compensation for injuries and vehicle damage.

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Researchers create a formula to detect texting drivers

The dangers of texting while driving are now well known. Studies have shown that the level of impairment and distraction for a driver while texting is similar to that of an intoxicated driver. Reaction times are much too slow and we have seen countless car accidents caused by texting drivers. Regulators have struggled to create laws that act as an effective deterrent, although efforts in some states have had noticeable benefits.

Now, a physicist has found a way to stop the behavior at the source – the phone. Researchers have detected a pattern in finger movements for text messages being typed while driving. People apparently have more erratic typing motions while driving, much like someone stumbling while they walk.

Researchers have created an equation that predicts whether or not a phone user is driving that is 99 percent accurate. The equation would theoretically allow software developers to create an application that locks the phone or shuts it down if a user is driving and texting.

This is an exciting safety innovation and would help act as a deterrent to the dangerous behavior without necessary legal reform in every state. The physicist who developed the equation says that he thought of the idea when contemplating his daughter getting behind the wheel. He said that an application could help prevent accidents and help parents enforce safe driving habits for their teens.

It could also have applications in law enforcement, similar to the use of ignition interlocks for repeat DUI offenders. “Eventually you might see something like this required on the phones of distracted drivers who’ve been involved in accidents,” he said.

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INCOMPLETE EHRS MAY LEAD TO MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CLAIMS

The health care industry is a constantly changing field. New advances in science and technology have saved many lives. In an effort to provide more comprehensive treatment to patients, there has been a push for hospitals and patients to have an electronic health record (EHR) in place. These records would ideally provide all necessary information to medical professionals to enable them to provide better care for patients and reduce the amount of medical malpractice claims for missed medical problems.

Unfortunately, EHRs are not working as planned. A recent report by the Bipartisan Policy Center lists one of the major concerns with EHRs that New Jersey medical professionals need to know. Health care facilities have different types of computer systems, and this makes communication difficult. It may not be possible to transfer complete records back and forth between the different facilities.

This could cause uncertainty for medical professionals about the types of care that a patient has already received, and could also have a very negative impact on a patient in need of medical care. For example, if a patient needs to go to the emergency room, what happens if an incomplete list of medications is listed in the EHR? This could lead to potentially harmful side effects if the wrong drugs are used during treatment.

There may also be another reason why a health care provider may not want to receive a complete EHR. A patient’s record will list all the tests that he or she has already been administered, which would limit the amount of money that the hospital could collect.

The report states that one-third of all doctors are currently using EHRs, which shows a slight increase from 2010 numbers. While the focus seems to be on getting physicians to adopt the records, there is a lack of attention focused on better communication between facilities. Patient safety may be at risk if better data-sharing plans are not put in place.

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Philadelphia makes list of country’s worst drivers

Allstate Insurance Company recently took a look which metropolitan areas sport the worst drivers. Philadelphia residents are apparently more prone to truck accidents than much of the country. The city ranks high on the list.

The study was reportedly based on property damage claims from January 2008 and December 2009. Based on that information and adjusted for population, researchers determined how likely drivers were to get into a collision.

Washington D.C. is apparently not the place to live if you fear car accidents; it ranked number one on the list. Residents there are likely to get into a car accident once every 4.8 years. According to MSNBC, those drivers are 107.3 percent more likely to get into an accident than the average U.S. driver.

Other cities ranking at the top include Baltimore, Newark and Providence. Surprisingly, New York didn’t make the Top 10, and only ranked 20th. Drivers there were found to get into accidents on average once every 7.3 years. However, it should be noted that cab drivers were not taken into account.

The study found that the country’s safest drivers tend to live in smaller cities. Fort Collins, Colorado, ranks as the safest place for drivers. Those residents were found to get into accidents only one time every 14 years.

Other “safe” cities include Lincoln, Nebraska, and Boise, Idaho.
Even though there have been fewer collisions on average in recent years, car accidents still claim 32,000 lives in this country every year. That’s a scary statistic.