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JURY RULES THAT PFIZER’S MENOPAUSE DRUGS CAUSED WOMEN’S CANCER

Many women in New Jersey and elsewhere take prescription drugs to help them weather the difficult symptoms of menopause. Hormone-replacement drugs can be helpful in easing hot flashes, mood swings and other uncomfortable ailments.

However, for menopausal women who unknowingly take defective drugs, the cure may be worse than the condition. Sadly, millions of American women have taken hormone-replacement drugs that have been shown to cause cancer.

Three drugs in particular have been the subject of numerous lawsuits. They are Premarin, Provera and Prempro, all manufactured by units of Pfizer.

Prior to 1995, menopausal women were commonly prescribed both Premarin and Provera to be taken together in order to treat symptoms. Prempro, which came out in 1995, is a combination of the two.

In 2002, an important study was released that linked these drugs to cancer. More than six million women were taking either Prempro or the related combination of drugs at the time.

Since then, Pfizer has faced a significant number of bellingham wa lawsuits related to its dangerous hormone-replacement drugs. Recently, a Philadelphia jury awarded three women a combined total of $72.6 million in damages after the plaintiffs successfully argued that Pfizer’s drugs caused or contributed to the development of their breast cancer.

One of the plaintiffs took Prempro while the other two women took the combination of Premarin and Provera. All had taken the drugs for more than two years. None of the women had history of breast cancer in their families.

The outcome of this lawsuit represents both a financial and moral victory for the plaintiffs. Sadly, despite the dangers of these drugs, they are still on the market. Millions of women may have already been injured and millions more may still be at risk.

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NEW JERSEY TURNPIKE ACCIDENT VICTIM NARROWLY ESCAPES DEATH

We have previously written that the New Jersey Turnpike is hot spot for serious crashes, including car and truck accidents. Factors like road construction only exacerbate the dangers already present from a high volume of traffic and dangerous drivers.

Yesterday, a commercial driver for a New Jersey company had his van destroyed on the Turnpike in an incident that was apparently caused by a nearby construction crew. Miraculously, he escaped relatively unscathed from a bizarre accident that easily could have been fatal.

The 63-year-old man was driving along the Turnpike in Mercer County at approximately 8 a.m. yesterday morning while a construction crane just off the highway was in the process of lifting a large piece of metal.

Suddenly, the metal beam swung into the line of traffic and smashed into the man’s Econoline van, completely taking off the vehicle’s roof, according to New Jersey State Police.

Amazingly, the man survived the accident. He did suffer injuries, including a broken thumb, cuts on his head that required stitches and cuts on his hand. His vehicle, however, was in much worse shape.

A tow-truck operator who responded to the accident said: “I can’t believe he walked away. I mean the entire passenger side and the roof were peeled off the van completely. It looks like a convertible.”

For now, the man and his family are simply celebrating the fact that he survived. However, attitudes may change as the incident is investigated. If the accident was caused by negligence on the part of the construction company or anyone else, the driver may be able to seek compensation for injuries and vehicle damage.

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Researchers create a formula to detect texting drivers

The dangers of texting while driving are now well known. Studies have shown that the level of impairment and distraction for a driver while texting is similar to that of an intoxicated driver. Reaction times are much too slow and we have seen countless car accidents caused by texting drivers. Regulators have struggled to create laws that act as an effective deterrent, although efforts in some states have had noticeable benefits.

Now, a physicist has found a way to stop the behavior at the source – the phone. Researchers have detected a pattern in finger movements for text messages being typed while driving. People apparently have more erratic typing motions while driving, much like someone stumbling while they walk.

Researchers have created an equation that predicts whether or not a phone user is driving that is 99 percent accurate. The equation would theoretically allow software developers to create an application that locks the phone or shuts it down if a user is driving and texting.

This is an exciting safety innovation and would help act as a deterrent to the dangerous behavior without necessary legal reform in every state. The physicist who developed the equation says that he thought of the idea when contemplating his daughter getting behind the wheel. He said that an application could help prevent accidents and help parents enforce safe driving habits for their teens.

It could also have applications in law enforcement, similar to the use of ignition interlocks for repeat DUI offenders. “Eventually you might see something like this required on the phones of distracted drivers who’ve been involved in accidents,” he said.

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INCOMPLETE EHRS MAY LEAD TO MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CLAIMS

The health care industry is a constantly changing field. New advances in science and technology have saved many lives. In an effort to provide more comprehensive treatment to patients, there has been a push for hospitals and patients to have an electronic health record (EHR) in place. These records would ideally provide all necessary information to medical professionals to enable them to provide better care for patients and reduce the amount of medical malpractice claims for missed medical problems.

Unfortunately, EHRs are not working as planned. A recent report by the Bipartisan Policy Center lists one of the major concerns with EHRs that New Jersey medical professionals need to know. Health care facilities have different types of computer systems, and this makes communication difficult. It may not be possible to transfer complete records back and forth between the different facilities.

This could cause uncertainty for medical professionals about the types of care that a patient has already received, and could also have a very negative impact on a patient in need of medical care. For example, if a patient needs to go to the emergency room, what happens if an incomplete list of medications is listed in the EHR? This could lead to potentially harmful side effects if the wrong drugs are used during treatment.

There may also be another reason why a health care provider may not want to receive a complete EHR. A patient’s record will list all the tests that he or she has already been administered, which would limit the amount of money that the hospital could collect.

The report states that one-third of all doctors are currently using EHRs, which shows a slight increase from 2010 numbers. While the focus seems to be on getting physicians to adopt the records, there is a lack of attention focused on better communication between facilities. Patient safety may be at risk if better data-sharing plans are not put in place.

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Staff May Have Been Negligent In New Jersey Amusement Park Accident

Last month, we wrote about an accident at a New Jersey amusement park in which five visitors suffered injuries on a water ride. While riding the Gauley at the Mountain Creek amusement park, 11 people became trapped at the mouth of a tunnel, five of whom suffered scrapes and bruises requiring medical attention.

While Mountain Creek and its current owners seem to have a good safety record, that particular ride was left over from a previous amusement park on the same property that went bankrupt after a number of expensive and high profile personal injury lawsuits.

Further investigation into the incident reveals that not only is the 30-year-old Gauley unsafe, but also suggests that the current staff of Mountain Creek is ill prepared to respond to emergencies.

It was recently revealed that the accident occurred when the vinyl liner inside of a tunnel ripped apart. It ended up trapping 11 riders and causing injuries to five of them. Furthermore, the real hero responsible for coordinating the rescue of these trapped riders was not a member of the park’s staff, but rather an off-duty officer from the Bergen County Sherriff’s Department.

Upon observing the trapped riders, the off-duty officer first gave assistance to a 13-year-old boy and then went to alert the lifeguards about the situation. A report issued by the Department of Community Affairs explains that “The guards apparently at first did not comprehend the severity of the situation and did not react.”

One lifeguard finally did jump to the officer’s aid, and together they worked to free the riders trapped under the ripped lining. Meanwhile, it took other staff members approximately 20 minutes to shut off water to the ride. By this time, most victims had already been freed.

The officer’s actions were commendable, and it was incredibly fortunate that he happened to be there that day. However, the report of this incident casts serious doubts on the competency and training of the park’s staff, which should have been primarily responsible for the safety of guests.

Although injuries were minor in this case, things could have been a lot worse.

When customers suffer injuries because of a business’s unsafe property or negligent staff, they may wish to seek appropriate compensation through a premises liability lawsuit.

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Obtaining Professional Assistance

This book outlines your rights and gives you basic information about enforcing them. In many cases, exercising your legal rights is difficult because the applicable law and court procedures are complicated. You may need a lawyer or a nonprofit counselor to help you with enforcing many of your rights. You may also need help to apply material in this book to your particular situation.

An additional factor is that state instead of federal law governs many of your rights. These laws can vary substantially from state to state. You may need to get more information of the laws applicable to your state. We have tried to point this out whenever possible.

Hiring a Florida Consumer Lawyer. It can be difficult to get legal help when you do not have much money. A good place to start is any option in your area for free legal services. In most communities (or close by if you live in a rural area), there are organizations which provide free legal help to people whose income fall below certain amounts. Although Congress has unfortunately cut back on funding for these organizations, they continue to exist and should be sought out if you need help.

These organizations vary widely on the type of cases they handle. They also have strict income limits so that they are forced to turn away many cases. However, it can’t hurt to ask. If they can’t help you, they generally will make a referral to the appropriate legal organization (often called “bar association”), sometimes for free help from a private lawyer. They also may have special pamphlets or other helpful information on your state’s laws.

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Not guilty: DNA evidence clears wrongly convicted defendants

Can you imagine serving a prison sentence for a crime you didn’t commit? Dealing with overwhelming feelings of injustice and frustration as you continue to assert your innocence even though no one will listen, not even your trust DUI lawyer? The US legal system is far from infallible. Misleading evidence, false testimony, and social prejudice can all cause innocent people to be declared guilty by a jury of their peers.

A recent article from the Washington Post describes the extreme guilt which plagues one woman every day after her testimony in court helped send an innocent man to jail for 27 years. The woman endured a horrible ordeal when she was raped after arriving at the day care center where she worked. However, after DNA evidence proved that she accused the wrong man of assault, she realized that she was no longer the only victim in this crime.

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Car Accident Leaves Three Wisconsin Motorists Injured

A truck accident involving a motorcycle over the weekend injured three Wisconsin motorists Saturday night in Sullivan, a town about 30 miles outside Milwaukee. The crash occurred around 7:30 p.m. on U.S. Highway 18, about a half mile west of Highland Drive.

According to recent news reports and the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, the crash occurred when a 1971 Chevrolet Corvette driven by Brain Hartig, of Waukesha, traveling eastbound on US 18 attempted to pass another vehicle by entering the westbound lane. While attempting the pass, Hartig’s Corvette struck the motorcycle of Timothy Thiel, of Jefferson.

Both Thiel and his female passenger, identified as Jody Orchel, of West Allis, were taken to Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital in Milwaukee by Flight for Life, following the truck accident requiring a pittsburgh truck accident lawyer for one of the victims. According to authorities, neither Thiel nor Orchel were wearing a safety helmet while riding his Harley-Davidson motorcycle. Their current conditions have not been released to the public at this time.

 

 

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Man From Edison, NJ Survives Brutal Crash

Authorities say that a 49-year-old man from Edison was fatally injured in a two vehicle accident early Wednesday morning in Piscataway. The motor vehicle accident occurred shortly before 7:00 a.m. at the intersection between South Washington and Centennial Avenues. Police believe a 59-year-old Dunellen man was driving a 2001 Buick on South Washington, before attempting to make a left-hand turn onto Centennial.
The accident victim was riding a Harley Davidson, which collided with the Buick. Police believe the driver of the Buick turned in front of the path of the Harley, which was travelling straight through the intersection. Authorities say that both drivers had a green light at the intersection where the fatal motorcycle accident occurred. Authorities say the motorcyclist was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash.
Police do not believe that drugs or alcohol played any role in the fatal accident. The motor vehicle wreck remains under investigation.
New Jersey State Police report that Wednesday morning’s crash was the fourth fatal accident of the year in Middlesex County. Others have been reported in Edison, Woodbridge and Perth Amboy. Motorcycle registrations are reportedly on the increase in New Jersey and federal statics show that motorcycle accident fatalities are also on the rise nationwide.
In New Jersey, the Governors Highway Safety Association notes that 59 people were killed in motorcycle accidents in each of the years 2009 and 2010, the latest data available. Typically the numbers are reflected during a nine-month time frame each year with New Jersey’s weather. During the time frame bracketed by the years 2003 and 2007, 377 people were killed in New Jersey motorcycle accidents

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Skateboard Towing Becomes a Real Problem

Oregon is one of a handful of states that have reported Beverly Hills accidents involving skateboard towing. Emergency room physicians and safety advocates around the world are noting an uptick in the number of so-called skitching accidents, and the injuries they report are serious. In addition to the expected broken bones, ERs have seen patients with spinal fractures and traumatic brain injuries — that is, if the skater has survived the accident at all.

Skateboard towing — also called skitching, longboarding and bumper surfing — is not a new practice. According to seasoned skateboard pros, skitching is a long-accepted mode of transportation in cities like Portland that are friendly to non-motorized vehicles.

Skaters around the country claim that “Back to the Future” had nothing to do with the widespread adoption of skitching. Rather, it came about when city dwellers were pushing their skateboards to work right alongside cars and trucks. The skaters were able to keep up with the commuter traffic, and they soon realized it would be just as easy to hold onto the car in front of them as it would be to push along behind it.

Pros do warn that skitching is a “don’t do this at home, kids” practice. Unskilled skaters and skaters who are just skitching for kicks — “gaming” — should keep off the roads.

Even experienced skitchers can get hurt, though. One man, described by a colleague as a ripper, fell in traffic and was run over by the car behind him. He is now in a wheelchair.

But that was an accident, says another pro. People get hurt in all sorts of activities, but it doesn’t mean the activity is inherently dangerous.

Safety experts, legal marketing experts, — including a neuropsychologist — voice considerable concern about skitching, though. In a car-versus-skateboard accident, the skateboard is going to lose. And skaters tend not to wear enough or appropriate protective gear. As football players have found out, a helmet can’t protect you entirely from a brain injury.

It looks as if skitching is here to stay, especially considering the number of skaters out there who believe they skate better than they walk.